The Outlaw – Part 9

A day and night past for the three travelers. Ben could sense the unease in their new member, Henry, and kept his distance. Although the bullets in his revolver would only tickle his immortal flesh, Ben didn’t enjoy the process of digging out the rounds. Sarah, on the other hand, despite their rocky start, constantly intervened for Ben and defended him against Henry. That first night at the camp fire, Ben had overheard their conversation from his place in the shadows.

Henry was trying to convince the innocent orphan to abandon the monster and they could travel alone. But, Sarah stuck by her guide.┬áBen wasn’t sure how to feel about her unconditional loyalty. Was she doing it out of fear that he would balk at the rejection or did she truly believe that he wouldn’t harm her?

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Werewolf Myths and Legends of Antiquity

So, werewolf stories have been around since oral tradition became a thing. They were scary stories to tell children to get them to behave, or warnings to God fearing Christians to keep away from anything having to do with the devil. Sometimes, however, the werewolves of these stories weren’t all bad and some actually did good deeds for humans. Here are just a few ancient tales of werewolves from around the globe.

King Lycaon – In the land of Arcadia lived a ruler known as King Lycaon. In the beginning of his reign, he did many good things for his people like erecting temples and monuments to the god Zeus and introduced culture to his people. After some time, however, Lycaon and his sons began to neglect the faith that they started out with. Zeus decided to test Lycaon after hearing rumors that the king was becoming a terribly tyrant. He descended from Mount Olympus and disguised himself as a countryman. He came to Lycaon’s palace, but the king immediately knew who the visitor was. (Here is where the story differs a bit and whether the king’s intentions were to present a sacrifice or insult Zeus is uncertain) King Lycaon served the god a portion of human flesh. When Zeus realized this, he grew enraged and brought destruction upon the palace. When Lycaon and his sons tried to escape, he transformed them into wolves. Continue reading

Werewolf Myths and Legends of Germany

Now, when reading these little fables, keep in mind that Germany – or the Germanic nation – was actually fairly large and took up a lot of land in Europe, including Poland and Slavic areas. So, some of these stories may be Germany, but others may be Polish in origin.

The Werewolf Who Ate a Colt – There were once two herdsmen and one of them possessed what was called a “wolf strap”. If a human donned the wolf strap, they would turn into a werewolf. This wasn’t necessarily frowned upon in this culture, because the wolf strap was a way for people to go out hunting as a wolf, which was more efficient. But, it just so happened that these two herdsmen grew drowsy after tending their herd for hours. The one who possessed the wolf strap fell asleep while the other pretended to fall asleep. The awake herdsman stole the wolf strap, turned into a wolf and went out to hunt. The herdsman who was asleep woke up in the middle of it and watched as the wolf killed and devoured a whole colt. He promptly went back to sleep (thinking nothing of this obviously). The wolf came back, took off the strap and napped as well. When he awoke, he had a terrible tummy ache and the other herdsman said “The devil himself would have a stomach ache if he had eaten an entire colt in one sitting too!” Continue reading

The Mysterious Stranger – Part 3

Tessa leaned back in the dining chair and sighed comfortably. The meal had been excellent and even though the slice of cherry pie in front of her was the best she had ever tasted, she forced herself to stop before she became too bloated. Christopher, on the other hand, was still plucking grapes off the vine cluster upon his plate and popping them between his lips. It wasn’t sexual by any means, but just watching the way he chewed each piece of fruit made her abdomen grow tighter with desire.

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Werewolf Myths and Legends of France

We take a detour from my regular fiction posts to reflect on different werewolf legends and myths from the French region of Europe. Instead of being called “werewolves” which is more of an English/German term, they were called Loup-Garou, which in literal translation is Wolf-Man. The height of werewolf related murders was in the 16th century into the first quarter of the 17th century. Over that span of 100 some-odd years, it was believed that over 30,000 individuals were killed by werewolves or people suspected of being werewolves. Continue reading

What is “Lycanthropy”?

werwolfMost of society – unless you’ve been living under a rock with no television – knows what a werewolf is. It’s a person, male or female and typically human, who can transform themselves into a wolf. Many different authors and hollywood producers have their own take on werewolves. Continue reading